Churches

St Andrews
Church of England

Arbour Street

Anglican Church-min
St Andrews Anglican Church

In May 1896, Bishop Riley wrote to Mr. Arnold Piesse beseeching him to investigate the building of a church, because the population of Katanning had outgrown the usual meeting places of private homes, the hotel and F. & C. Piesse’s hall.
In 1897 an application to sell Lot 51 was approved and the proceeds of the sale to be applied to the building of the church.
In 1898 an application for a loan in aid of church building was approved.
The Bishop was also anxious to have a rectory built with the least possible delay on the church site.
With typical pioneering spirit the challenge was taken up and on June 25, 1898 the foundation stone of the new church was laid by Mrs. F. H. Piesse, on Katanning block 428 on the corner of Aberdeen and Arbour Streets, about one kilometre from the railway station.

slwa_b2951839_1-min
The architect was Mr. P. W. Harrison and the contractor was Mr. A. J. Stewart.
The building is constructed of local bricks on a foundation of plinth concrete with forty thousand of the bricks a gift from Messrs F. & C. Piesse.
The roof and floor are made of Jarrah, a gift from the Millar brothers, and the porch is laid with Milton tiles.
Mr. Frederick Henry Piesse presented a large King James Bible to the church.
The inscription reads, “A.M.D.G …. Presented for use in St Andrew’s Church Katanning by Fredrick Henry Piesse, Christmas 1910”.
The Chancel window was erected in 1910 and this window, together with the brass plaque by the organ loft was erected in memory of the Piesse family.
After the death of Mr F. H. Piesse, the parishioners commissioned G. Holdsworth of Bridgetown to fashion a brass lectern to honour his memory.
The inscription reads:
“To the Glory of God and in memory of the Hon. Frederick Piesse CMG, Founder of Katanning and a zealous and faithful churchman who entered into rest 29th June 2012. This lectern was given by parishioners.”
Piesse was a staunch supporter of the Church of England.

St Andrews Church Hall

Aberdeen Street (Rear St Andrews Church)

katanning-anglican-church-st-andrews-1-hall-april-2015
St Andrews Church Hall – Aberdeen Street

The Church Hall was built in 1911 – the foundation stone was laid by the Hon. F.C. Piesse MLC,  the architect was Mr. E. Summerhayes FRIBA, and secretary was Mr F. M. Gare.
A piano was donated by Mr. Macrae, and the church became the focus of social life in Katanning.
The building is of Federation Tudor brick asymmetrical construction with timber framed corrugated iron roof and twin roof vents.
It is a four bay plan with a centrally located entry between asymmetrical elements at the front and the bricks were locally made.
The building also features castellated parapet walling and buttressing, the latter possibly being added after the hall was completed.
The roofing structure is quite unique with a combined rafter and tension cable design truncating the steep roof pitch.
The original Gothic arched front door has been replaced although windows and other doors all feature Gothic arches.
Extensions made to the rear of the church are of a different style.
The interior has solid timber roof panelling and painted walls.
The hall is primarily significant in terms of its relationship to St Andrew’s Church, which is the oldest remaining church in Katanning.
The functions and events, which occurred in the hall, contributed very much to the social and religious life of the people of Katanning, in particular the large Anglican community.
The style of the hall is uncommon in Anglican architecture of the period and is commonly found in non-conformist religious architecture.
The hall and church have strong links with the Piesse family, which contributed much to the construction of both buildings.
The Hon. F H Piesse laid the foundation stone for the church hall on 27th March 1911, on a site adjacent to the existing St Andrew’s Church.
The hall was used weekly for parish meetings, dances, fundraisers and various other activities.
A few years after the hall was completed, additions were made to the rear, which included kitchen and eating facilities, toilet amenities.
In the mid 1950s, room was set-aside in the hall for office space for Mr A C Stark, from Wells Organisation Pty Ltd.
Mr Stark organised many fundraising events and was instrumental to the continued growth and development of the Anglican community during this time

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St. Peter’s Anglican Church

Badgebup Town Site
Compiled by Doreen Clegg,
November 1986

church of england st pater's church badgebup lost katanning

St. Peter’s Church, Badgebup was built as a memorial to Private John Campbell Dale Warren, eldest son of J.C. and Lillie Warren of “Dyliabing” and other boys of the district killed in action in the First World War 1914-1918.
These were early days of settlement in the district, the Warren family having taken up land in 1898, and Campbell’s parents thought that a district church would be a fitting memorial to their son.
The project received great support and in 1919 Mr. R.L. Richardson donated an acre (one thousand square metres) of land for the Church.
He owned the paddock and nearby General Store.
Quarrying of the soap stone began on “Dyliabing” (11 kms north of Badgebup) on the 31st May, 1919.
In July a working bee was held fencing two sides of the block and planting ornamental trees.
On October 25th that year Mr. Herbert Eales of the architects, Messrs. Eales and Cohen of Perth, came to inspect the site.
He was also a talented musician and on that occasion a social was held to raise funds for the Church and he played the piano.
Mr. J.C. Warren and his son Gilbert continued to quarry the stone in their spare time, using dynamite to get the stone out.
The architects estimated that 218 cubic yards (155 cubic metres) net of stone was required as apparently only 18 cu.ft. of useful stone was in one yard (or only 66% of one metre) of ordinary quarried stone. On the 28th January, 1920 the quarrying of stone began regularly and on February 20th the first trolley of stone (1/2 tonnes) was carted.
On June 22nd, 1920, Messrs. Eales and Cohen visited to choose a site on the block for the Church and they planted a tree on each side of the gate.
Mr. Cohen was, in fact, a returned soldier and both men took a particular interest in St Peter’s and later wrote “we have taken a great Interest in the little Church and have never looked upon it as a business proposition.”
Carting of the stone began in earnest on 12th February, 1921 and the local settlers (of all denominations) rallied around and gave freely of their time by helping the Warren family cart the stone in their wagons and teams of horses.
A sled on greased rails was constructed so that the cart horse could pull the stone out of the quarry and on to the wagons.
Building commenced on the 28th December, 1921 but prior to this a shed was built on the site.
Sand and water also had to be carted and this was mainly done by Gilbert Warren.
The lime for the mortar came from a deposit on Mr. E.A. Clegg’s property, a few miles south of the Church, and this was carted by Mr. Clegg and his two sons.
The stonemasons were Mr. George Thorpe, who had lost two sons in the War, and his nephew Mr. Wright.
Mr. H.A. Groth of Leederville was engaged to build the furniture and the carpenters were Mr. Tom Berry and his brother Cyril, both ex-soldiers.
Donations for the furniture and furnishings came from many quarters; including the Warren family in Western Australia and South Australia, friends and neighbours, Sisters Vera and Rosalie of Perth College (where Campbell’s sisters had completed their education), Dr. Wilson Bishop of Bunbury and Archdeacon and Mrs. Burbidge.
The Church was named “St Peter’s” after St Peter’s College, Adelaide, South Australia where Mr. Warren and his sons were educated.
On the 29th December, 1921, Canon (later Archdeacon) Burbidge of Katanning laid the very first flat foundation stone for the base of the buttress on the N.E. corner of the chancel.
On the 4th February, 1922 came the official laying of the foundation stone.
This was carried out by Mrs. J.C. Warren in the presence of Bishop Cecil Wilson of Bunbury, Archdeacon Burbidge of Katanning, local residents and visitors.
The stone is inscribed TO THE GLORY OF GOD.
There is a jade stone built in the wall above the foundation stone which came from the Warren’s old family farm “Springfield” in South Australia (45kms north-east of Adelaide). This was such a proud occasion for the district that Mr. Bob Turner loaned his large Union Jack which was run to the top of the pole for the laying of the stone.
Mr. Eales also took part by accompanying the singing on the organ.
In April, 1922, before the Church had a roof, the first christening took place.
The baby was Barbara, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ted Goodchild.
On Saturday, 16th September, 1922, the consecration was performed by His Grace the Archbishop of Perth, C.D.L. Riley (as Bishop Wilson of Bunbury was ill) and the Archbishop also planted a tree.
The next day a Choral Communion Service was held for which Mr. E.A. Clegg Snr had written the music.
A choir of local men and women was formed and led by Mr. Clegg who was the organist of the Church until he retired to live at Emu Point in 1939 when Mrs. Laurie Caldwell took over.
The first wedding at St Peter’s was solomnised on the 11th September, 1923 when Margaret (Meg) Warren married Ernest Clegg.
On Saturday, 27th October, 1923, the Governor Sir Francis Newdegate and Lady Newdegate visited St Peter’s. They were on a train going through to Pingrup for the official opening of the railway. Special arrangements were made to stop the train at Badgebup so that they could pay a special visit to the Church.
A large crowd of people turned out to meet them and watch Sir Francis plant a pine tree.
Another important visitor was Sir Maurice Hankey. Sir Maurice was an English relative of J.C. Warren and, while visiting Australia on matters of defence in 1934, he attended a service.
Afterwards he and Lady Hankey planted red flowering gums, but only Sir Maurice’s survived and still stands today.
Memorials to the Hankey family are to be found in the Church.

church of england st pater's church badgebup lost katanning

POINTS OF INTEREST IN THE CHURCH

The roof was originally sheoak shingles but was later replaced by tiles.
The porch is considered unique and it is interesting to see the Architects designed this porch with a roof and seats “for rest and shade”.
The belfry was erected after the completion of the Church.
The bell was given in memory of J.C. Warren’s cousin, John Warren Bakewell, by his wife. The bell was made by Messrs. Gillett and Johnstone of Croydon, England in 1924.
Before it arrived Mr. Warren wrote to the Minister for Trade and Customs asking if the bell could be admitted duty free, explaining what it was for, and this reply came back and duty had to be paid!

Melbourne
9th July, 1924.
Dear Sir,
I have to acknowledge receipt of your letter of the 271h June, 1924, In which a request was made for admission free of duty for a bell for St Peter’s Church, Badgebup, W.A. and I desire to inform you that it is regretted that there is no item in the Tariff under which the request could be acceded to.
The tariff provides for admission free under item 417(b) of articles donated to the public or a public institution, but the legal advisers of the Commonwealth have held that articles donated to a Church cannot be brought within the item.
Yours faithfully,
(sgd) H. E. PRATTEN
MINISTER FOR TRADE AND CUSTOMS

church of england st pater's church badgebup lost katanning

CONCLUSION
Since the early days, additional work and maintenance has been carried out, notably the altar frontal was made by Mrs. R. E. Tree in 1959.
The ornamental gates were made in May 1960 by local farmers Gordon Ohrt and George Goodchild.
Following the death of J.C. Warren in 1947, his son Gilbert took over as Secretary of the St. Peter’s Committee and later served on the vestry of St. Andrew’s representing St. Peter’s until his death in 1973.
On the 17th September, 1972 a Golden Jubilee Service was held.
This was conducted by the Rt. Revd. Warwick Bastian, Bishop of Bunbury, assisted by the Revd. Michael Harford who was rector in Katanning at that time.
This was followed by a large gathering of Badgebup and district residents, former residents and old friends, in the Hall.
Similarly, on the 9th June, 1982 a service was held to mark the Diamond (60th) Anniversary of the Church.
This was held appropriately on Pioneer Day of W.A. Week.
Later, at afternoon tea in the Hall, Mrs. Cicely Blackall (nee Warren) and Mr. Angus Caldwell (son of Oliver Caldwell) gave talks and reminiscences on the building of the Church, etc.
It has been said that a memorial is not a dead thing but a living presence in the Community.
This is true of St Peter’s Church.
An Anglican service is conducted once a month for the Badgebup and Nyabing district and, from time to time, weddings and baptisms take place.
Annually the Badgebup/Rockwell Red Cross Unit organise an interdenominational service in St Peter’s.
Other denominations have had the use of the Church and in the 1960’s regular services were held by Methodists and Presbyterians.
This was, of course, the hope of J.C. Warren – that St Peter’s would be a Church for the whole community.

July 2007    ADDENDUM
The historic value of St. Peter’s Church was recognised in January 1996 when it was added to the official Heritage List of Western Australia.
By this time a great deal of restoration work was needed.
Possums were getting through loose tiles in the roof and damaging the ceiling.
The walls were also badly cracked.
In February 1996 a Restoration Committee was formed, made up of five Badgebup residents.
Application was later made for a Grant through the National State Grants Programme.
An initial Grant of $2,000 was received to pay for the services of a Structural Engineer Mr. Ralph Unger of Albany.
After inspection he pinpointed the necessary work and agreed it should proceed.
The Heritage council then allocated a Grant of $17,000 in September 1998 which would include the work of an Architect Mr. David Heaver of Albany.
He approved the work and suggested the main item; a colourbond roof.
A fundraising campaign followed as the cost would exceed the Grant.
This was a great success with the generosity of local residents, past residents, families and interested people.
Katanning builder Mr. Alan Julian was employed to replace the roof and this work was completed in April 1999.
In April 2001 Katanning builder Mr. Dominic Schiano filled in and plastered the cracked walls and, in April 2001, Constant Ceilings Ltd. replaced the possum damaged ceilings.
In September 2001 local couple Nick and Cecily Richardson volunteered to paint the Church prior to their marriage.
The efforts of so many people proved to be worthwhile as St. Peter’s had been resorted to its former state.
The notice board and a new fence was the result of a Grant from the Centenary of Federation Project 2001.
An unfortunate incident happened in July 2002 when the jade stone from “Springfield” S.A. next to the foundation stone was stolen.
The stone has not been recovered or the culprit found.
In December 2004 a bushfire destroyed a large area of Badgebup.
The fire raged through the Churchyard destroying fences and trees.
Through prompt action from Volunteer Firemen the church was saved and stands today –

A Church in the Bush for use of the Community.

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Presbyterian Church (Fmr)

1906 – Scott’s Church : 1926 – Presbyterian Church : 1977 – Current –  Uniting Church
Taylor Street

Uniting church lost katanning Presbyterian

The former Presbyterian Church also represents the former Methodist congregation, which was established in Katanning at the same time.
The Uniting Church therefore has social and historical significance, especially in light of the fact that little authentic evidence remains from the Methodist Church building.
The church building has some architectural and aesthetic significance with its unique spire, which forms part of the skyline of the town.
A brick and corrugated iron building of Federation Gothic design it has a prominent zinc clad spire protruding from a battlement campanile.
Additions have been made to the north-east side of the original church building.
The front has three trefoil head windows within a lancet opening and quatrefoil window within the arch although the additions are intrusive.
The Rev. George Brewster of Albany gave the first Presbyterian service in Katanning in the early part of 1900.
The interest stimulated by this first service resulted in a local committee being formed, the main purpose of which was to establish a minister in the district.
In November 1900 Rev. A K Ross became the first Presbyterian minister to be posted in Katanning.
The early days of the Presbyterian congregation were not without their problems.
A scattered and constantly moving population, lack of suitable building in which to conduct services, and want of experience of Australia and Australians were only a few of the difficulties. [Thomas, p. 91]
Owing to poor health, Rev. Ross resigned from the charge in 1904, but he had begun the work of having a church built.
His successor, Pastor A Lusted continued on with this work and “lost no time in raising the superstructure on the foundations already well and truly laid” [Thomas, p. 91]
Mr F W Burwell of Fremantle prepared plans for the church, and the contractor was Alex Thomson.
The contract price was £567 10s, and added to the cost of the land the whole project cost nearly £700.
The bricks were all made locally and the roof of the church spire was skilfully performed by plumber, Charles Mitchell.
Pastor Lusted left in June 1906 and his replacement, Rev. John Smith was to see the foundation stone being laid 19 October, 1906, and the church open in October 1906.
During the ceremony, attended by the Right Rev. H C Matthews and two hundred people, the secretary, John Barley, placed a sealed bottle containing newspapers and documents in a cavity in the memorial stone.
The stone was removed on the 100th Anniversary of the building and a time capsule was recovered. This was replaced in the wall with additional information.
Also in 1906 those Badgebup residents who were of the Presbyterian faith built a small iron and bush timber church on government land where they held monthly services.
Services were also being held at Rockwell, Woodanilling, Carrolup and Maracoonda.
These places were visited by Pastor Lusted  in a hired horse and trap
In the 1960s the church and hall were in need of repairs, additions and alterations and the church was rewired when SEC power was connected to the town.
The original timber fence was removed and replaced by a low brick fence constructed by Bob Coventry.
A new notice board was purchased, repairs were done to the front outside wall (also by Bob Coventry), the hall windows were weatherproofed and some kitchen cupboards installed. In addition, Messrs Leach and McFarland repaired the leadlight windows, which had been damaged, and the Presbyterian Ladies Guild organised for new carpet to be laid in the church.
The possible amalgamation of the Katanning Presbyterian and Methodist Churches was first discussed in the early 1960s.
In 1972 it was a reality and the two churches combined to form the United Parish of Katanning and Districts.
After a trial period it was decided by the Council to use and develop the Presbyterian Church and buildings and to sell the Methodist Church (now known as the Autumn Club).

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Methodist Church (Fmr)

Methodist Church lost katanning

The first Methodist services in Katanning were held at the old Government School (now part of the Historical Society Museum) from 1903 until the opening of the new church in 1905.
The former Methodist Church (pictured) has some social and historical significance, as it is an early example of religion in the community and a reminder of the many Methodists who settled in Katanning.
The foundation stone was laid by Mrs Wesley Maley on Wednesday, 4 October, 1905.
The church was officially opened on Wednesday, 6 December, 1905 by Mrs Robinson with the dedication taking place on Sunday, 10 December, 1905 by Reverend T.A. James.
The architectural integrity of the building has been hindered somewhat by the blocking off of the original entry, the additions to the rear and the removal of nearly all the original internal fittings and fixtures.
The building was re-opened in 2001.
The building is in Gothic style with a gabled roof, pier buttresses and lancet arched windows.
The exterior walls are tuck-pointed, red brick, cement rendered on the lower half and the roof is of corrugated iron.
There are two additions to the rear, dating from 1919 and c 1930. The interior fixtures such as the pews, altar and pulpit, were removed when the Methodist and Presbyterian Churches amalgamated.
At the time it was opened services were also being conducted at Carrolup and Moojebing by Rev. Albert Moyle and plans were under way for services to be held at Broomehill and Langaweira (a farming property 25kms south-east of Katanning).
A manse was constructed at 17 Carew Street and, from its opening on 17 February 1909, it continued to serve the ministers and their families for 50 years.

methodist church lost katanning
The original interior wood carvings were done by local carpenter, E A Rogers, identified by his carved mouse insignia.
The original church building was 41ft in length by 26 ft wide, and had coloured cathedral glass windows.
Eventually, as was the overall trend, the Methodist and Presbyterian Churches amalgamated to form the Uniting Church and the congregation moved into the Presbyterian Church in 1972.
The building was used for a while as the Autumn Club a senior citizens’ club.
It was also used again for a short while as the Wesleyan Church and is now vested in the Katanning Historical Society.

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St Stephen’s
Lutheran Church

katanning-lutheran-church

St Stephen’s Church is physical evidence of the influx of the German South Australian settlers who arrived in the Shire of Katanning at the turn of the century.
Their way of life and religious beliefs were very different to the existing settlers and the church reflects this.
Although integration was, at first, not always successful (particularly in light of the two World Wars), these settlers of German descent have become a significant part of the history of the shire.
The first Lutheran Church was erected in 1905 in corrugated iron and wood on the site where the present hall now stands.

st stephen's lutheran church lost katanning
The second St Stephen’s Lutheran Church building (1926)

Lutheran church second lost katanning
This hall was originally built as a church in 1926 to replace the original church.
A third church, the current one was erected in 1964, next-door to the second church, on the site of a house.
The second church (1926) underwent modifications and additions to become the church hall, as well as provide room for Sunday school classes.
The church is a simple three-bay auditory plan with lancet windows.
The walls are of brick with stucco string courses, the lower walls have been rendered and the roof replaced with zincalume.

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Katanning Mosque

lost katanning mosque church muslim islam

The Katanning Mosque was built in 1980 by the local Islamic community who arrived in Katanning in 1974 after moving from Christmas Island and was opened in 1981 by Allayarham Tunku Abdul Rahman, the first Prime Minister of Malaysia.
The community has continued to grow with relatives from the Cocos Islands moving to Katanning.
Katanning’s large Moslem community originated from the Cocos and Christmas Islands.
The Cocos-Malays are descended from workers brought to the Cocos Islands in the 19th century to assist with the harvesting of coconuts for copra.
The islands were isolated during much of their habitation and a unique culture and language has developed based on original Malay traditions and the Islamic religion.
Many of the Malays that come from Cocos Island have been living here for almost 40 years and more.
Although assimilating well into their new community their relationship with the community on the island is still close including language, customs and the way of life of the Cocos island.
At the back of the mosque there is also a religious school which is used as a classroom to teach the Malay community children every weekend and within the Mosque the Malay language remains the main language.
However, Malay children here no longer speak the Malay language with their parents.
They still understand the Malay language but are not able to answer properly and the young generations language is strongly influenced by the Australian dialect.
For now, the remnants of the old ‘Malay’ culture is still to be found in Katanning.
Malay food (based on Wedding dishes), the mosque and the warmth and hospitality of the Malay people.
Malaysians and Indonesians are starting to visit Katanning to experience this cultural link for themselves.

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Salvation Army Citadel (Fmr)

salvation army citadel church lost katanning

The first Salvation Army meeting was held in the Town Hall in January 1893 under the leadership of Captain Ivey Smallbone and Lieutenant Edward Holman.
Salvation Army officers covered wide areas often holding services in tents in outlying areas.
Katanning Corps closed for a brief period in the 1900’s and reopened in 1911 under the direction of Captain Frank Wan.
The first purpose-built building in Katanning was built near the town’s flour mill.
Bricks were imported from Egypt and the roof was made of iron.
A small room at the rear of the building provided living quarters.
On 5th October 1926 the Army bought a block in Richardson Street to erect a hall and living quarters.
The Citadel was completed in 1928 and was opened by local member of parliament Alex Thompson.
Church services and Sunday School for children were held regularly, in 1925 the Home League was established and in 1928-1979 the Salvation Army Band was functional.
Youth Group “Sunbeams” formed in later years.
A Thrift shop for second hand furniture, clothes and general goods was conducted from the site.
After over one hundred years’ presence in Katanning, the Salvation Army was forced to close its doors in 2004 due to the decline in members and continuing maintenance costs.
Over the years, the Katanning Salvation Army was a familiar driving force in the community.
Its members provided care, compassion and assistance in times of crisis and to those in need.

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St Patrick’s
Roman Catholic Church

St Patrick's roman catholic church lost katanning today

The first wood and iron Catholic Church, St Patrick’s was opened in 1893.
This was the first Catholic Church to be built between Albany and Beverley, and was located at the southern end of Austral Terrace on the corner of Bokarup Street opposite the original sheep sale yards.
The first parish priest was Father Duff and Bishop Gibney laid the foundation stone.

first saint st patrick's church lost katanning
The first Catholic Church built between Beverley and Albany, with Rev. Fr. Phelan in the foreground.

 

catholic church lost katanning
Katanning’s first sheep sale yards, built by A.E. Piesse just prior to changing his business name to Katanning Stock and Trading Company Ltd., with the original St Patrick’s Church in the left background.

 

catholic church lost katanning
The old church being demolished by Mr Marshall.

 

St Patrick's roman catholic church lost katanning
St Patrick’s Church in Amherst Street prior to additions and alterations.
catholic church lost katanning
The Church in 1976 after the extensions and alterations were complete.

By the early 1920s the parish had outgrown its church, so in 1923 a block of land was purchased on the north side of the Amherst Street for £300.
The site of the original church was sold to the Vacuum Oil Company for £450 and was developed as fuel storage depot. The block now houses commercial storage units.
The new church was opened on 19th August 1923 with Father Reidy having been a major force behind the project and the church was blessed by Archbishop Clune.
The Architect was M F Cavanagh and the builder was Alex Thomson, who constructed many of Katanning’s prominent buildings at the time.
St Patrick’s school was also erected on the church block in the same year.
In 1937/38, Father Byrne carried out improvements to the church by adding a confessional box and new seating.
In the same year Mrs. M J Garrity placed a statue of Our Lady of Lourdes and accompanying angels in the sanctuary.
When Fr McSweeney arrived in 1959 he took over the work started by Fr Casey, and launched the “Wells Fund Raising Campaign” to raise finance for additions to the church. The additions were completed and consecrated by Rev. Goody, Bishop of Bunbury in August 1962, the designer and builder being S. Costello.
An improvement carried out in 1959 surround Cavanagh’s original concept and the campanile appears to be part of this campaign.

JUBILEE PUBLICATION

lost katanning saint st patrick's church school jubilee 1976
Click on image above for a scanned copy of
the 1926-1976 St Patrick’s Jubilee Booklet.
If  you would like a better scan of a particular page
please
email me at:

webmaster@lostkatanning.com.au

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SAINT RITA’S CONVENT
Sisters of our Lady of the Mission

St Rita's convent school roman catholic nuns our lady of the missions lost katanning


On January 29th, 1926, four Sisters of Our Lady of the Mission came from Highgate to establish a Convent in Katanning.
The Sisters took up temporary residence in Mrs. Norrish’s town-cottage, which had been generously vacated for the purpose.

catholic church lost katanning
The cottage used by the four Sisters of Our Lady of the Mission upon arriving in Katanning in 1926

At Easter the Sisters purchased the 17-roomed house of Mr. Male, M.H.R., (below) and Dr. House’s property adjoining.
The necessary alterations and additions having been made, the “Guest House” was converted into a very fine Convent.
For the first few months the Church was utilised for the purpose of attending to the educational needs of the children, but before the end of the year a fine brick Day School of modern design had been erected, and before the official opening in November by Archbishop Clune, the total cost (£970) had been raised by the pupils.
A splendid financial achievement!
Since then the school, in both Primary and Secondary Departments, has gone ahead by leaps and bounds.
One hundred and seven girls and boys are in daily attendance.
The Catholic pupils are carefully trained in the principles of their Religion, and they, as well as those of other denominations, are given a sound moral, intellectual and physical training.
Remarkably successful have been the candidates presented for the university examinations, Junior and Leaving.
The secondary subjects taught at the school are English Literature, Latin, French, Biology, Geology, Physiology, Agricultural Science, Economics, History, Geography, Algebra, Geometry and Trigonometry.
The examinations in music – Pianoforte and Violin – have been no less successful than the school examinations. Pupils have gained the highest certificates of Trinity College and the Royal Academy.
Other instruments taught are the Steel Guitar and Mandolin.
Elocution, Painting and Commercial subjects receive due attention.
To provide for the increasing number of boarders, an imposing, commodious two-storey Boarding School costing £8,500 is in course of construction, and should be completed in time for the re-opening of school on 3rd February, 1930.

catholic church lost katanning
The second Convent in 1926. This building was originally ‘Brockhurst Private Hospital’ before being purchased by the Church for use as a convent. It stood between the current ‘Reidy House’ and Arbour Street facing Andover Street.

 

 

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