WW11

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WW11 Nominal Roll

Over 520 people from Katanning and surrounding districts, and well beyond, enlisted for World War Two (WW11) in Katanning. Due to such a large number I have only listed those below whose registered place of birth was Katanning.
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You can research all 527 people HERE

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World War Two Enlistments

Enlisted in KATANNING

Men & Women who were BORN in, and ENLISTED in, Katanning

ANTONIO, MARY MONICA

ANTONIO, THOMAS CHARLES

BADGER, FRANCIS BERNARD

BAGG, ROBIN

BAHLINGER, MAVIS ROSE

BAHLINGER, ROBERT FREDERICK

BAIN, NORMAN FREDERICK

BALL, MAXWELL WHYLIE

BARKLEY, FLORENCE IVY

BARROT, JEAN

BEECK, GORDON WINFRED

BEECK, HORACE EDGAR

BEECK, HURTLE JOSEPH

BEECK, MARCUS TRUBY

BEECK, NEVILLE ANDERSON

BEECK, ROSS

BERGER, JOFFRE NICHOLAS

BERGER, PERCY BENJAMIN JOHN

BLAKE, DARREL JOSEPH

BLISS, ALBERT

BLISS, FREDERICK

BOLT, GEORGE LYLE

BOWDEN, JOHN MILLS

BREMNER, SHIRLEY CLARE

BUDD, HOWARD CHARLES

BUNNEY, RAYE LILLIAN

BUTTERWORTH, WILLIAM BROADBENT

CARLSON, JOHN FREDERICK

CASEY, HENRY GEORGE

CATTANACH, WALTER GEORGE

CHEETHAM, HENRY JAMES

CHEETHAM, VICTOR ARTHUR

COLLINGWOOD, PHILIP ARTHUR

CORNELIUS, GERALD JOHN

CORNELIUS, MAURICE EDWIN

COURTIS, ERIC ROSS

CRONIN, LINDSAY WALTER

CRONIN, UNA ELLEN

CRUICKSHANK, LAURENCE JAMES

DAY, ANGAS HUGH JOHN

DUSTING, HARRY WILLIAM

FARMER, RICHARD

FILMER, STANLEY GEORGE

FITZGERALD, CHARLES JOHN

FITZGERALD, LAURENCE JOSEPH

FLEAY, CAMPBELL

FLUGGE, BRICE WALTHER

FLUGGE, REX ARNOLD

FOLLAND, ROSS

GARE, FRANK LESLIE

GARMAN, MARGARET HILDA

GARSTONE, CYRIL RICHARD

GARSTONE, ERIC JACK

GENONI, EDWARD ANGELO

GILCHRIST, CHARLES ALBERT

GOODWIN, FREDERICK WILLIAM GEORGE

HADDLETON, IVAN JOB

HADDLETON, JOB CLIFFORD

HADDLETON, LESLIE FRANCIS

HADDLETON, URIEL ROBERT

HALE, STEPHEN ROBERT

HALL, JAMES

HALL, JAMES GALLETLY

HAMS, ERIC GEORGE

HAMILTON, Ian Bartram

HAMILTON, KINLEY HENRY

HANNA, KEITH FREDERICK

HANNA, LESLIE GORDON

HANNA, VALMA ALICE

HARRIS, KATHLEEN GRACE

HARRIS, ROBERT ARTHUR

HARRIS, WILLIAM MURRAY

HASTIE, DESMOND WILLIAM

HASTIE, RAYMOND FREDERICK

HEAL, RAYMOND CHARLES

HENCHIE, JOYCE

HEWSON, EDWARD WOODHEAD

HOETKER, ERNEST AUGUST

HOFMANN, ERNEST TEMPLE

HOGAN, WILLIAM HUGH

HOGLIN, DON LOUIS

HOGLIN, LANCELOT WARREN

HOGLIN, STAN HAMPTON

HOTKER, NORMAN AUGUST

HOUSE, RONALD PETER

JOHNSON, RICHARD

JURY, MERLE CAMPBELL

JURY, RONDA FLORENCE

JUSTINS, LAURIE

KENWARD, CLARA DOROTHY

KENWARD, ERIC JOHN

KICKETT, JOSEPH

KOWALD, ADOLF WALLACE

KOWALD, ERNEST LESLIE

KOWALD, FREDERICK ERNEST

KOWALD, NORMAN EDWIN

LADYMAN, HECTOR CLAUDE

LADYMAN, AUDREY

LADYMAN, DOUGLAS EATON

LADYMAN, JOHN MERCER

LADYMAN, PHILLIP

LADYMAN, ROBERT FRANCIS

LAWRANCE, MARY

LINDNER, AUSTIN FREDERICK

LINDNER, LEWIS LISBON

LONGMIRE, MURRAY WALTER

LONGMIRE, ROBERT MAULE

MARQUIS, THOMAS HENRY

MARSHALL, KEITH RAY

MARTYN, WILLIAM ROBERT

MCAULIFFE, KEVIN THOMAS

MCDONALD, ERNEST VIVIAN

MCDOUGALL, PERCY ALAN

MCKENZIE, ANDREW

MCLEOD, ALBERT KEITH

MCLEOD, GEORGE

MCLEOD, JAMES ALFRED

MCLEOD, WILLIAM NORMAN

MELDRUM, GEORGE EDWARD

MEYN, DOUGLAS CLAUS

MITTER, FREDERICK JOSIAH

MONCASTER, FREDERICK

MORRELL, JESSICA ENID

MOSSCROP, LEONARD JAMES

MULLINEUX, JAMES HENRY

NAGEL, CARL JOHN

NEWPORT, ALFRED JAMES

NEWPORT, RICHARD ALFRED

NORRISH, ARTHUR JAMES

NUNAN, ROY RICHARD

NUNAN, MALCOLM ERNEST

O’HALLORAN, DAVID CLANFERGEAL

O’HALLORAN, HUIE NICKOLAS

OLD, RICHARD CHARLES

PAGE, HENRY VICTOR

PATTERSON, FREDERICK CHARLES

PATTERSON, HOLLY JOYCE

PATTERSON, NOBLE GEORGE

PEMBER, CLAIRE

PITCHERS, DOUGLAS

PITCHERS, LEONARD WALTER

POPE, DOUGLAS CAMPBELL

POPE, JOHN CAMPBELL

PRATT, PETER CLEGG

PRIEST, FREDERICK GEORGE

PUMPHREY, ELLA BERTHA

QUARTERMAINE, DESMOND

QUARTERMAINE, FORD ROBINSON

QUARTERMAINE, KEITH CHARLES

QUARTERMAINE, TIM

RAFFERTY, ARTHUR WILLIAM

RALSTON, HAROLD BERTRAM

RICHARDSON, ROBERT MAXWELL

ROGERS, CECIL FREDERIC ERNEST

SAXBY, AILEENE JOYCE

SCOTT, MARY

SEVERIN, RONALD KEITH

SEYMOUR, WILLIAM DAVID

SLEE, ALLAN MAXWELL

SLEE, FRANCIS EDGAR

SMITH, DESMOND KEITH

SMITH, NORMAN GORDON

STANFORD, LAWRENCE JAMES

STANFORD, MARY ELIZABETH

STANFORD, NORA DORIS

STEICKE, ALFRED JOHN

STRONACH, DONALD WALTER

STRONACH, RAYMOND BRUCE

STUBBS, RONALD

SYNNOTT, FRANCIS INGLIS

TANNER, LES BERT

THOMAS, KENNETH GEORGE

THOMSON, FREDERICK JAMES

THOMSON, JOHN IVO

THOMSON, LILLIAS KENDALL

TREE, RONALD VIVIAN

TRELOAR, LLOYD KITCHENER FRENCH

TURNBULL, LINDA

TURNER, DARCY ROBERT

WALTERS, ARNOLD SYDNEY

WANKE, HERBERT OWEN

WARREN, GILBERT DUNBAR

WINSCOM, WALLACE

WOOLLETT, CHARLES WILLIAM

If you have a name of a Katanning resident not born in Katanning, please let me know their FULL name, date of birth and town of birth if possible. I will the add them below:

COLES, RONALD

BALSTON, MONTAGUE

HAMBLY, GEORGE

HAMBLY, LEWIS JOHN

RALSTON, GORDON LIONEL

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Second World War, 1939–45

From The Australian War Memorial Website

On 3 September 1939 Prime Minister Robert Gordon Menzies announced the beginning of Australia’s involvement in the Second World War on every national and commercial radio station in Australia.

Almost a million Australians, both men and women, served in the Second World War. They fought in campaigns against Germany and Italy in Europe, the Mediterranean and North Africa, as well as against Japan in south-east Asia and other parts of the Pacific. The Australian mainland came under direct attack for the first time, as Japanese aircraft bombed towns in north-west Australia and Japanese midget submarines attacked Sydney harbour.

On 7 May 1945 the German High Command authorised the signing of an unconditional surrender on all fronts: the war in Europe was over. The surrender was to take effect at midnight on 8–9 May 1945. On 14 August 1945 Japan accepted of the Allied demand for unconditional surrender. For Australia it meant that the Second World War was finally over.

The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) participated in operations against Italy after its entry into the war in June 1940. A few Australians flew in the Battle of Britain in August and September, but the Australian army was not engaged in combat until 1941, when the 6th, 7th, and 9th Divisions joined Allied operations in the Mediterranean and North Africa.

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At sea off Crete in the Mediterranean, 19 July 1940: Italian cruiser Bartolomeo Colleoni under attack from HMAS Sydney near Cape Spada

Following early successes against Italian forces, the Australians suffered defeat with the Allies at the hands of the Germans in Greece, Crete, and North Africa. In June and July 1941 Australians participated in the successful Allied invasion of Syria, a mandate of France and the Vichy government. Up to 14,000 Australians held out against repeated German attacks in the Libyan port of Tobruk, where they were besieged between April and August 1941. After being relieved at Tobruk, the 6th and 7th Divisions departed from the Mediterranean theatre for the war against Japan. The 9th Division remained to play an important role in the Allied victory at El Alamein in October 1942 before it also left for the Pacific. By the end of 1942 the only Australians remaining in the Mediterranean theatre were airmen serving either with 3 Squadron, Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) or in the Royal Air Force (RAF).

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North Africa, 6 January 1941: Australian troops advance into Bardia.

Japan entered the war in December 1941 and swiftly achieved a series of victories, resulting in the occupation of most of south-east Asia and large areas of the Pacific by the end of March 1942. Singapore fell in February, with the loss of an entire Australian division. After the bombing of Darwin that same month, all RAN ships in the Mediterranean theatre, as well as the 6th and 7th Divisions, returned to defend Australia. In response to the heightened threat, the Australian government also expanded the army and air force and called for an overhaul of economic, domestic, and industrial policies to give the government special authority to mount a total war effort at home.

In March 1942, after the defeat of the Netherlands East Indies, Japan’s southward advance began to lose strength, easing fears of an imminent invasion of Australia. Further relief came when the first AIF veterans of the Mediterranean campaigns began to come home, and when the United States assumed responsibility for the country’s defence, providing reinforcements and equipment. The threat of invasion receded further as the Allies won a series of decisive battles: in the Coral Sea, at Midway, on Imita Ridge and the Kokoda Trail, and at Milne Bay and Buna.

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Milne Bay, Papua, September 1942: a Bofors gun position manned by the 2/9th Light Anti-Aircraft Battery, Royal Australian Artillery, at Gili-Gili airfield. In the background a Kittyhawk is about to land.

Further Allied victories against the Japanese followed in 1943. Australian troops were mainly engaged in land battles in New Guinea, the defeat of the Japanese at Wau, and clearing Japanese soldiers from the Huon peninsula. This was Australia’s largest and most complex offensive of the war and was not completed until April 1944. The Australian army also began a new series of campaigns in 1944 against isolated Japanese garrisons stretching from Borneo to Bougainville, involving more Australian troops than at any other time in the war. The first of these campaigns was fought on Bougainville and New Britain, and at Aitape, New Guinea. The final series of campaigns were fought in Borneo in 1945. How necessary these final campaigns were for Allied victory remains the subject of continuing debate. Australian troops were still fighting in Borneo when the war ended in August 1945.

While Australia’s major effort from 1942 onwards was directed at defeating Japan, thousands of Australians continued to serve with the RAAF in Europe and the Middle East. Athough more Australian airmen fought against the Japanese, losses among those flying against Germany were far higher. Australians were particularly prominent in Bomber Command’s offensive against occupied Europe. Some 3,500 Australians were killed in this campaign, making it the costliest of the war.

Over 30,000 Australian servicemen were taken prisoner in the Second World War and 39,000 gave their lives. Two-thirds of those taken prisoner were captured by the Japanese during their advance through south-east Asia in the first weeks of 1942. While those who became prisoners of the Germans had a strong chance of returning home at the end of the war, 36 per cent of prisoners of the Japanese died in captivity.

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Singapore Straits Settlements, 19 September 1945: members of 2/18th Australian Infantry Battalion, prisoners of war of the Japanese, in Changi prison.

Nurses had gone overseas with the AIF in 1940. However, during the early years of the war women were generally unable to make a significant contribution to the war effort in any official capacity. Labour shortages forced the government to allow women to take a more active role in war work and, in February 1941, the RAAF received cabinet approval to establish the Women’s Auxiliary Australian Air Force (WAAAF). At the same time, the navy also began employing female telegraphists, a breakthrough that eventually led to the establishment of the Women’s Royal Australian Naval Service (WRANS) in 1942. The Australian Women’s Army Service (AWAS) was established in October 1941, with the aim of releasing men from certain military duties in base units in Australia for assignment with fighting units overseas. Outside the armed services, the Women’s Land Army (WLA) was established to encourage women to work in rural industries. Other women in urban areas took up employment in industries, such as munitions production.

More reading >>>

Overview of WW11
“Fellow Australians, it is my melancholy duty to inform you officially, that in consequence of a persistence by Germany in her invasion of Poland, Great Britain has declared war upon her and that as a result, Australia is also at war.”
Prime Minister Robert Menzies

A Bitter Fate—Australians In Malaya & Singapore
In December 1941 Japanese forces landed at Malaya and began a rapid advance southwards towards Singapore. Australians were among the Allied forces fighting to halt the advance. On 15 February 1942 the city fell to the Japanese, and more than 130,000 British and Allied troops were taken prisoner of war, including some 15,000 Australians. More than 1100 other Australians were either confirmed dead or listed as missing in action, and hundreds of others remained unaccounted for.

Century of Service series
Decision—Stories of Leadership in the Services
We all make decisions every day – they shape the lives we lead. In times of war, decision-making can take on a greater significance. Many Australians over the past century of service have demonstrated leadership with the decisions they have made.

NOTE:

Copyright

© Commonwealth of Australia 2012

This work is copyright. You may download, display, print and reproduce this material in unaltered form only (retaining this notice) for your personal, non-commercial, educational and educational institutional use or use within your organisation. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, all other rights are reserved.

For further information contact:
Department of Veterans’ Affairs
GPO Box 9998
Canberra ACT 2601
02 6289 1111

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